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The global market for substation automation systems is poised to jump from $2.94 billion in 2012 to $15.58 billion by 2020, according to a report from Zpryme.

The research firm explains that substation automation systems allow electric utilities to optimize their substations - and, thus, their overall distribution systems - through the use of an array of technologies.

In 2012, the report says communication networks and monitors, intelligent electronic devices (IEDs), and sensors accounted for 59% of the global substation automation market. By 2020, those technologies will account for 58% of the market.

Fifty-five percent of the market was made up of new and advanced substation systems in 2012 (vs. 45% for retrofit systems). In 2020, new and advanced substation systems will account for 60% of the global market (vs. 40% for retrofit systems).

Last year, North America accounted for 40% of the global substation automation market, while Europe and the Asia-Pacific accounted for 20% and 25%, respectively. By 2020, the report says the Asia-Pacific will hold 39% of the market, while North America and Europe will account for 25% and 18%, respectively.

China, the U.S. and Japan will represent the three largest countries for substation automation technologies by the end of the decade.

β€œPowered by the big energy brands, ABB, Alstom Grid, Siemens, Schneider Electric and GE, the substation evolution from a legacy to next-gen automation is growing at an exponential rate globally,” comments Mark Ishac, managing director of Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. β€œIn addition to the smart grid, driving the substation automation space are the usual suspects: distribution intelligence, bottom-line capital cost savings, security and grid stability.”

For more information on the Zpryme report, click here.




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