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The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced up to $7 million in funding to advance the design of microgrids that will help communities become more adaptive and prepared for power outages caused by severe weather and other events.

The DOE says that the "Microgrid Research, Development and System Design" funding opportunity announcement targets teams of communities, technology developers and utilities to develop advanced microgrid controllers and system designs that will help communities take a comprehensive approach to microgrid design and implementation.

Each applicant, the DOE notes, will be required to work with an entity or community to design microgrid systems that are no more than 10 MW in size. The DOE adds that applicants will be encouraged to design systems that protect critical infrastructure, such as hospitals and water treatment plants.

"Developing more advanced microgrid systems will help communities build stronger and smarter so they are better prepared for the effects of a changing climate," comments Patricia Hoffman, assistant secretary for electricity delivery and energy reliability at the DOE. "This funding is another important step in our drive to partner with communities, developers and utilities in this area of critical importance."

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28. More information is available here.


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