in News Departments > Projects & Contracts
print the content item

Commercial solar developer Dragonfly Solar and manufacturer SolarWorld will partner to deliver a 517 kW solar array to four electric utility cooperatives in the U.S. Midwest.

According to SolarWorld, the solar array will be owned and managed by Minnesota-Three, an entity jointly owned by Minnesota-based utility cooperatives Freeborn-Mower Cooperative Services, People's Energy Cooperative and Tri-County Cooperative.

La Crosse, Wis.-based Dairyland Power, the cooperative power wholesaler for the region, has signed an agreement to purchase the solar array’s renewable energy output, SolarWorld says.

Construction of the solar facility is scheduled to begin this spring in Oronoco, Minn., SolarWorld reports, and upon completion, the array will be interconnected to People's Energy Cooperative's power delivery system.

SolarWorld notes that the project was funded in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Energy for America Program, which helps small businesses, farmers and ranchers in rural communities purchase and install renewable energy equipment.


Hybrid Energy Innovations 2015
Latest Top Stories

SPP Raises Concerns About EPA's Proposed Clean Power Plan

Stakeholders around the U.S. are mulling over the Environmental Protection Agency's blueprint to cut emissions from existing power plants. The Southwest Power Pool has released its assessment of the plan.


Comverge, Constellation To Merge Demand Response Businesses

The two companies have announced a deal to combine their DR operations serving commercial and industrial customers and establish a new, standalone entity.


Grid-Scale Energy Storage Continues Making Inroads

A new report from Navigant Research highlights the biggest markets and most popular technologies for grid-scale energy storage.


Demand Response And Renewables Help SDG&E Tackle Record-Breaking Heat Wave

San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) recorded peak demand records last week and relied heavily on energy conservation, as well as imported wind and solar power, to keep the lights on.


Report: Utility-Scale Renewables Keep Getting Cheaper

A new study suggests the levelized costs of energy of utility-scale wind and solar power are catching up with those of traditional sources, even without subsidies.

Hybrid Energy Innovations 2015
S&C Electric_id176
edf_id180