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Honeywell will supply automated demand response technology and services to San Antonio-based municipal utility CPS Energy under a two-year program.

According to Honeywell, the program will build upon a pilot project that CPS Energy and Honeywell completed last year. The pilot, Honeywell says, included nine commercial and industrial facilities and helped trim demand by approximately 1.5 MW - a more than 10% reduction in each building on average.

The companies are now looking to enroll 60 additional sites, bringing the potential reduction to nearly 6 MW, Honeywell reports. As part of the program, Honeywell notes that it will identify and enroll customers, audit their buildings to identify curtailment opportunities, and work to customize and implement changes that trim energy use but do not impact core business functions.

In return for joining, customers receive an incentive for each kilowatt they are able to shed, Honeywell adds. The hardware and software installed can also help each organization better manage electricity use every day and boost long-term energy efficiency.

Honeywell says it will also provide its Akuacom demand response automation server to help enable CPS Energy to send signals to building automation systems at sites enrolled in the program, triggering the short-term load-shedding measures customers select.

In addition, Honeywell reports that it manages a residential demand response program for CPS Energy, which started in 2004 and now involves more than 81,000 homeowners.


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