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Maxim Integrated Products Inc., a manufacturer of analog and mixed-signal semiconductor products, has rolled out Petaluma, a subsystem reference design to help utilities and infrastructure providers measure distributed power grid data.

According to Maxim, Petaluma is a high-speed, simultaneous-sampling, eight-channel analog input front-end solution that monitors grid data simultaneously from all phases, helping grid managers optimize their distribution automation signal chain.

The company says that the solution is tuned to the 50 Hz to 60 Hz signal to match power grids around the world. Maxim adds that the simultaneous sampling of three phases is done with low power consumption in the 1 W range, and Petaluma's 250 ksps per channel sample rate comes with 16 bit accuracy.

"Petaluma was developed as an analog front-end solution ideally suited for the distribution automation grid," remarks David Andeen, reference design manager at Maxim. "The subsystem reference design's high sample range of 250 ksps per channel ensures accurate capture of fault events so utilities can take immediate action within a single cycle."


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