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Plymouth, Minn.-based Zero-Max Inc., a manufacturer of power transmission components, has introduced composite disc couplings for the wind turbine industry.

The couplings are designed with composite disc packs at both ends of a center spacer. These patented designed disc packs provide the true strength and calculable flexibility of the coupling. The composite disc packs (flex elements) allow a surplus of parallel and axial misalignment, while remaining torsionally stiff through all harmonic ranges of the wind turbine's oscillating load.

Depending on application, the Zero-Max's center spacers can be machined out of steel, composite glass fiber or 6061-T6 aluminum. Through the use of finite element analysis, these center spacers can be engineered to withstand in excess of 70,000 Newton meters of torque, depending on the material selected.

For more information, visit zero-max.com.

SOURCE: Zero-Max Inc.


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