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IEEE has announced updates to four smart-grid-related standards and a new standards-development project to provide new communications and operational capabilities.

The latest IEEE smart grid standards include the following:

IEEE 1815-2012 - Standard for Electric Power Systems Communications - Distributed Network Protocol (DNP3) - specifies the DNP3 protocol structure, functions and interoperable application options for operation on communications media used in utility automation systems.

It revises the earlier standard, IEEE 1815-2010, by updating its protocols to address and help mitigate current and emerging digital cybersecurity hazards that could affect the communications systems used in smart grids and other infrastructure, including power, energy and water systems, IEEE says.

IEEE 1366-2012 - IEEE Guide for Electric Power Distribution Reliability Indices - defines the distribution reliability nomenclature and indices that utilities and regulators can use to characterize the reliability of distribution systems, substations, circuits and grid sections, according to the organization.

The standard also defines the factors affecting the calculation of the indices. It revises the earlier standard, IEEE 1366-2003, by including new indices that can be used today and in the future on smart grid and other distribution systems. It also updates several definitions that were used in the previous standard.

IEEE 1377-2012 - IEEE Standard for Utility Industry Metering Communication Protocol Application Layer (End Device Data Tables) - provides common structures for encoding data that is transmitted over advanced metering infrastructure and smart grids.

The organization says the standard can be used to transmit data between smart meters, home appliances, network nodes that use the IEEE 1703 LAN/WAN messaging standard, and utility enterprise collection and control systems. The standard revises IEEE-1377-1977.

IEEE C37.104-2012 - IEEE Guide for Automatic Reclosing of Circuit Breakers for AC Distribution and Transmission Lines - describes automatic reclosing practices for transmission and distribution line circuit breakers, establishes the benefits of automatic reclosing, and details the considerations utilities must use when applying automatic reclosing technologies for proper coordination with other transmission and distribution system controls, according to IEEE.

The standard revises IEEE C37.104-2002 by incorporating new smart grid communications technologies that may affect utility automatic reclosing practices.

Additionally, IEEE has announced a new standards-development project to categorize and describe applications that are being considered as part of smart distribution system development and distribution management systems for smart grids.

According to the organization, IEEE P1854 - Guide for Smart Distribution Applications will categorize the applications, describe their critical functions, define their most important components and provide examples. The terminology and descriptions used for these systems have previously not been standardized, IEEE notes.



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