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The Idaho Public Utilities Commission (IPUC) has approved Avista's electric rate request, whereby there will be no change in base rates for electric customers, but the costs associated with the Palouse Wind Project will be recovered through the state's power cost adjustment mechanism.

Residential electric customers using an average 930 kWh per month will see an increase of $2.04 beginning Oct. 1, for a revised monthly bill of $80.73. The approved overall 3.1% increase, representing $7.8 million in increased annual revenues, is being offset by a $3.9 million credit resulting from a payment made to Avista by the Bonneville Power Administration relating to its prior use of Avista's transmission system.

"The outcome of this rate request gives our Idaho customers more certainty in their energy rates for the next two years while providing a framework for positive outcomes for our shareholders," says Dennis Vermillion, Avista Corp.'s senior vice president and president of Avista Utilities.

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