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The global demand for grid storage applications will grow from a modest $200 million in 2012 to $10.4 billion in 2017, according to a new report from Lux Research.

Key findings of the report include the following:

Partner-or-perish environment. Lux Research says that in the tumultuous 18 months since September 2011, each of the six market-leading grid storage developers faced at least one major technical or financial issue, with several lower-ranking companies seeking acquisitions or packing up and moving east to China. To hedge risks, developers are turning to strong corporate partnerships to stay in business. The report notes that having a strong partnership does not guarantee success but averts destruction.

Networks support technology developers.
Of the 877 companies Lux evaluated in the grid storage network, 718 are linked together in a mega-cluster, while 169 remain on the perimeter alone or in strings of isolated relationships. The report says the vast majority - 725 - are not technology developers but financial, education or government organizations that can help developers build their technological prowess and sales channels.

Americas losing global share. The Americas account for 49% of the existing grid storage market but will lose ground to 26% by 2017, representing a $2.7 billion market. Europe, on the other hand, has a miniscule installed cumulative base of active grid storage projects - worth only $34 million and accounting for a mere 3% of the world’s installed capacity, according to the report. However, its demand potential is expected to grow to $3.5 billion, representing 33% of the global demand potential by 2017.




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